There are a lot of things in life that are truly complicated and challenging to solve – a long-term solution for peace in the Middle East, calculus, mapping the human genome, or deciphering if my wife is really ‘fine’ or if I’m actually in trouble.

On the other hand, there are things that seem more difficult than they are – breaking bad habits, living healthier, being happy, the proper usage of “there” “their” and “they’re.”

I’m not going to attempt to unravel the mysteries of the former set of truly challenging things to solve – but, I will certainly address the latter set of things that seem difficult to get a grip on.

Want to break a bad habit? It’s simple – commit to it. Whether it’s to stop biting your nails or quit smoking, it can be done. Millions have accomplished it. And, there are many great support systems out there.

Want to live healthier? Start with your grocery list. If you don’t buy chips, you can’t eat chips. Can’t get to the gym? Do push-ups, crunches, dips, and lunges while watching TV. Just get active.

Want to be happy? Make the conscious decision to be happy. Do things that make you happy. How’s that for simplicity?

Listen, I know time and money are finite resources, but it should never stop you from filling up your life with valuable and worthwhile experiences. If traveling is your passion and the budget is tight, do day trips while you save up for your big excursion. If you enjoy painting or writing or dancing, go do them.

If something is important to you, you will make the time. If it’s not, you’ll likely find an excuse.

Unfortunately, some folks pontificate on the big problems in the world (which is noble), yet may tend to ignore what they can improve upon on a daily basis. It can be scary to confront ourselves. I implore you, don’t be that person. Learn to be vulnerable, to communicate, to be honest with yourself. In this approach to simplicity, you will grow, you will enhance your relationships, and you will champion a much more vibrant and successful life.

And, in case you were wondering, “There” is a location. “Their” is a possessive. “They’re” is a contraction of a noun and a verb. For example, “Their house is being remodeled so they’re staying over there until the work is done.”

Simple – no PhD required.

Live on Fire!

Source: https://blog.ipeccoaching.com/a-lesson-in-simplicity